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Solid Earth An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2020-118
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2020-118
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  10 Jul 2020

10 Jul 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal SE.

Extracting microphysical fault friction parameters from laboratory- and field injection experiments

Martijn Peter Anton van den Ende1, Marco Maria Scuderi2, Frédéric Cappa1,3, and Jean-Paul Ampuero1 Martijn Peter Anton van den Ende et al.
  • 1Université Côte d'Azur, IRD, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Géoazur, France
  • 2Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, La Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy
  • 3Institut Universitaire de France, Paris, France

Abstract. Human subsurface activities induce significant hazard by (re-)activating slip on faults, which are ubiquitous in geological reservoirs. Laboratory and field (decametric-scale) fluid injection experiments provide insights into the response of faults subjected to fluid pressure perturbations, but assessing the long-term stability of fault slip remains challenging. Numerical models offer means to investigate a range of fluid injection scenarios and fault zone complexities, and require frictional parameters (and their uncertainties) constrained by experiments as an input. In this contribution, we propose a robust approach to extract relevant microphysical parameters that govern the deformation behaviour of laboratory samples. We apply this Bayesian approach to the fluid injection experiment of Cappa et al. (2019), and examine the uncertainties and trade-offs between parameters. We then continue to analyse the field injection experiment reported by Cappa et al. (2019), from which we conclude that the fault-normal displacement is much larger than expected from the adopted microphysical model (the Chen-Niemeijer-Spiers model), indicating that fault structure and poro-elastic effects dominate the observed signal. This demonstrates the importance of using a microphysical model with physically meaningful constitutive parameters, as it clearly delineates scenarios where additional mechanisms need to be considered.

Martijn Peter Anton van den Ende et al.

Martijn Peter Anton van den Ende et al.

Model code and software

Extracting microphysical fault friction parameters from laboratory-and field injection experiments Martijn van den Ende, Marco Scuderi, Frédéric Cappa, and Jean-Paul Ampuero https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.12613007

Martijn Peter Anton van den Ende et al.

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Latest update: 20 Sep 2020
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Short summary
Injection of fluids (like wastewater or CO2) into the subsurface could cause earthquakes when existing geological faults inside the reservoir are (re-)activated. To assess the hazard associated with fluid injection, previous studies have conducted experiments in which fluids have been injected into cm- and Dm-scale faults. In this work, we analyse and model these experiments. To this end, we propose a new approach through which we extract the model parameters that govern slip on faults.
Injection of fluids (like wastewater or CO2) into the subsurface could cause earthquakes when...
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