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https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2020-181
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2020-181
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  26 Oct 2020

26 Oct 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal SE.

Reverse time migration (RTM) imaging of iron-oxide deposits in the Ludvika mining area, Sweden

Yinshuai Ding and Alireza Malehmir Yinshuai Ding and Alireza Malehmir
  • Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, SE 75236, Uppsala, Sweden

Abstract. To discover or delineate mineral deposits and other geological features such as faults and lithological boundaries in their host rocks, seismic methods are a qualified choice, given their resolution power at depth. One major goal for seismic methods is to produce a reliable image of the subsurface given the typical discontinuous geology in crystalline environment with low signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, we investigate the usefulness of reverse time migration (RTM) imaging algorithm in hardrock environment by applying it to a legacy 2D dataset, which was acquired in the Ludvika mining area of central Sweden. We provide a how-to solution for applications of RTM in future and similar datasets. When using the RTM imaging technique properly, it is possible to obtain high-fidelity seismic images of the subsurface. Due to good amplitude preservation in the RTM image, the imaged reflectors provide indications to infer their geological origin. Aside from the chosen seismic imaging algorithm, we illustrate that two other important factors for successful RTM imaging workflows are the suitable acquisition and careful data pre-processing. Exemplified with the Ludvika legacy data, the RTM method allows imaging the iron-oxide deposits at a great level of detail down to 1200 m depth as shown from previous studies. It also provides much-improved images of the lithological contacts and crosscutting features relative to the mineralized sheets. Some of the imaged crosscutting features are considered to be crucial when interpreting large-scale geological structures of the site and the likely disappearance of mineralization at depth. The RTM imaging workflows have the potential to be used on hardrock seismic data and for deep targeting mineral deposits, a key message we would like to deliver in this article.

Yinshuai Ding and Alireza Malehmir

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Yinshuai Ding and Alireza Malehmir

Yinshuai Ding and Alireza Malehmir

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Latest update: 04 Dec 2020
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Short summary
In this article, we investigate the potential of reverse time migration (RTM) for deep targeting iron-oxide deposits and possible AVO effect that is potentially seen in the common image gathers from this migration algorithm. The results are promising and help to delineate the deposits and host rock structures using a 2D dataset from Ludvika Mines of central Sweden.
In this article, we investigate the potential of reverse time migration (RTM) for deep targeting...
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