Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-101
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-101

  09 Jul 2019

09 Jul 2019

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal SE but the revision was not accepted.

Anassessment of GIA solutions based on high-precision GNSS velocity field for Antarctica

Wenhao Li1, Fei Li1,2, Shengkai Zhang1, Jintao Lei3, Qingchuan Zhang1, Feng Xiao1, and Lexian Yuan4 Wenhao Li et al.
  • 1Chinese Antarctic Center of Surveying and Mapping, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China
  • 2State Key Laboratory of Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China
  • 3Department of Land Surveying and Geo‑Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom 999077, Hong Kong, China
  • 4Changjiang Spatial Information Technology Engineering Co., Ltd., Wuhan 430010, China

Abstract. Past mass loads, especially LGM (Last Glacial Maximum), may cause the viscoelastic response of the Earth, this phenomenon is the so-called glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). GIA not only includes the horizontal and vertical motions of the crust but also the shape, the gravity field and rotation axis of the earth. Due to the uncertainties in the ice loading history and the mantle viscosity, modeling GIA will be difficult and challenging in Antarctica. The GPS velocity field provides an effective method to constrain the GIA vertical velocity; however, to obtain the high-precision GPS velocity field, we must consider the effects of common mode error(CME) and the choice of optimal noise model (ONM). We used independent component analysis(ICA) to remove the CME recorded at 79 GPS stations in Antarctica and determined the ONM of GPS time series based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Then, the high-precision GPS velocity field is obtained; we used the high-precision GPS velocity field to assess the application of GIA models in Antarctica. The results show that the maximal GPS velocity variation is up to 1.15 mm yr−1, and the mean variation is 0.18 mm yr−1. We find systematic underestimations of all GIA model velocities in the Amundsen Sea area (ASE). In the north Antarctic Peninsula (NAP), the vertical velocities are underestimated by 6 GIA models but not the WANG model. Because the upper mantle viscosities in the NAP are lower than those in the south Antarctic Peninsula (SAP),the GPS vertical velocities in NAP regions are larger than SAP regions. In the Filscher-Ronne Ice Shelves (FRIS), the observed GPS velocity and predicted GIA model velocity are consistent. In East Antarctica (EA), the vertical motion is nonsignificant, and the GIA and ice loading have a small impact in this area.

Wenhao Li et al.

 
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Wenhao Li et al.

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Short summary
GIA is the solid Earth’s slower viscoelastic response to past changes in ice-ocean loading. GIA influences plate tectonics, crustal displacements, the geoid and regional sea level patterns.Due to the uncertainties in the ice loading history and the mantle viscosity, modeling GIA will be difficult and challenging in Antarctica.we used the high-precision GPS velocity field to assess the application of GIA models in Antarctica.