Articles | Volume 12, issue 12
Solid Earth, 12, 2703–2715, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2703-2021
Solid Earth, 12, 2703–2715, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2703-2021

Research article 30 Nov 2021

Research article | 30 Nov 2021

Imaging crustal structures through a passive seismic imaging approach in a mining area in Saxony, Germany

Hossein Hassani et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on se-2021-32', Mehdi Zare , 01 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Hossein Hassani, 14 Jul 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on se-2021-32', Mehdi Zare , 02 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Hossein Hassani, 14 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on se-2021-32', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 May 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Hossein Hassani, 14 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Hossein Hassani on behalf of the Authors (11 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Sep 2021) by Michal Malinowski
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (06 Oct 2021)
ED: Publish as is (06 Oct 2021) by Michal Malinowski
ED: Publish as is (07 Oct 2021) by CharLotte Krawczyk(Executive Editor)
Download
Short summary
Passive seismic imaging methods use natural earthquakes as seismic sources, while in active seismic imaging methods, artificial sources (e.g. explosives) are used to generate seismic waves. We imaged some structures related to a major fault plane through a passive seismic imaging approach using microearthquakes with magnitudes smaller than 0.9 (Mw). These structures have not been illuminated by a previously conducted 3D active seismic survey due to their large dip angles.