Articles | Volume 12, issue 4
Solid Earth, 12, 959–969, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-959-2021
Solid Earth, 12, 959–969, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-959-2021

Research article 23 Apr 2021

Research article | 23 Apr 2021

Nanoscale earthquake records preserved in plagioclase microfractures from the lower continental crust

Arianne J. Petley-Ragan et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Arianne Petley-Ragan on behalf of the Authors (04 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (08 Feb 2021) by David Healy
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Feb 2021) by David Healy
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (12 Mar 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (15 Mar 2021) by David Healy
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (15 Mar 2021) by Federico Rossetti(Executive Editor)
AR by Arianne Petley-Ragan on behalf of the Authors (18 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Earthquakes cause rapid deformation that has long-term effects on the Earth's crust. We studied the most abundant mineral, feldspar, in the vicinity of an earthquake to unravel its deformation history. With microscopy, we found internal nm-scale structures that indicate a history of high stress and destruction of atomic structure. This was quickly followed by high temperature and fluid introduction within seconds. Our findings illustrate the intense conditions imposed on rocks by earthquakes.