Articles | Volume 12, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-959-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-959-2021
Research article
 | 
23 Apr 2021
Research article |  | 23 Apr 2021

Nanoscale earthquake records preserved in plagioclase microfractures from the lower continental crust

Arianne J. Petley-Ragan, Oliver Plümper, Benoit Ildefonse, and Bjørn Jamtveit

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Latest update: 21 Feb 2024
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Short summary
Earthquakes cause rapid deformation that has long-term effects on the Earth's crust. We studied the most abundant mineral, feldspar, in the vicinity of an earthquake to unravel its deformation history. With microscopy, we found internal nm-scale structures that indicate a history of high stress and destruction of atomic structure. This was quickly followed by high temperature and fluid introduction within seconds. Our findings illustrate the intense conditions imposed on rocks by earthquakes.