Articles | Volume 9, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-1051-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-1051-2018
Research article
 | 
22 Aug 2018
Research article |  | 22 Aug 2018

Bimodal or quadrimodal? Statistical tests for the shape of fault patterns

David Healy and Peter Jupp

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Short summary
Fault patterns formed in response to a single tectonic event often display significant variation in their orientations. This variation could be noise on underlying conjugate (or bimodal) fault patterns or it could be intrinsic signal from an underlying polymodal (e.g. quadrimodal) pattern. We present new statistical tests and open source R code to calculate the probability of a fault pattern having two (bimodal, or conjugate) or four (quadrimodal) clusters based on their orientations.