Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
Solid Earth, 11, 691–717, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-691-2020
Solid Earth, 11, 691–717, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-691-2020

Research article 30 Apr 2020

Research article | 30 Apr 2020

Surface deformation relating to the 2018 Lake Muir earthquake sequence, southwest Western Australia: new insight into stable continental region earthquakes

Dan J. Clark et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Dan Clark on behalf of the Authors (01 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Mar 2020) by Cristiano Collettini
ED: Publish as is (25 Mar 2020) by Federico Rossetti(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
A magnitude 5.3 reverse-faulting earthquake in September 2018 near Lake Muir in southwest Western Australia was followed after 2 months by a collocated magnitude 5.2 strike-slip event. The first event produced a ~ 5 km long and up to 0.5 m high west-facing surface rupture, and the second triggered event deformed but did not rupture the surface. The earthquake sequence was the ninth to have produced surface rupture in Australia. None of these show evidence for prior Quaternary surface rupture.