Articles | Volume 12, issue 11
Solid Earth, 12, 2671–2702, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2671-2021

Special issue: New insights into the tectonic evolution of the Alps and the...

Solid Earth, 12, 2671–2702, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2671-2021
Research article
25 Nov 2021
Research article | 25 Nov 2021

Imaging structure and geometry of slabs in the greater Alpine area – a P-wave travel-time tomography using AlpArray Seismic Network data

Marcel Paffrath et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,206 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
1,497 674 35 2,206 79 25 19
  • HTML: 1,497
  • PDF: 674
  • XML: 35
  • Total: 2,206
  • Supplement: 79
  • BibTeX: 25
  • EndNote: 19
Views and downloads (calculated since 07 May 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 May 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,206 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,091 with geography defined and 115 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 03 Feb 2023
Short summary
The Alpine mountain belt was formed by the collision of the Eurasian and African plates in the geological past, during which parts of the colliding plates sank into the earth's mantle. Using seismological data from distant earthquakes recorded by the AlpArray Seismic Network, we have derived an image of the current location of these subducted parts in the earth's mantle. Their quantity and spatial distribution is key information needed to understand how the Alpine orogen was formed.