Articles | Volume 12, issue 11
Solid Earth, 12, 2671–2702, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2671-2021

Special issue: New insights into the tectonic evolution of the Alps and the...

Solid Earth, 12, 2671–2702, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2671-2021
Research article
25 Nov 2021
Research article | 25 Nov 2021

Imaging structure and geometry of slabs in the greater Alpine area – a P-wave travel-time tomography using AlpArray Seismic Network data

Marcel Paffrath et al.

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Teleseismic P waves at the AlpArray seismic network: wave fronts, absolute travel times and travel-time residuals
Marcel Paffrath, Wolfgang Friederich, and the AlpArray and AlpArray-SWATH D Working Groups
Solid Earth, 12, 1635–1660, https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-1635-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-1635-2021, 2021
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject area: Core and mantle structure and dynamics | Editorial team: Seismics, seismology, paleoseismology, geoelectrics, and electromagnetics | Discipline: Seismology
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Marcel Paffrath, Wolfgang Friederich, and the AlpArray and AlpArray-SWATH D Working Groups
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Cited articles

Aki, K., Christoffersson, A., and Husebye, E. S.: Determination of the three-dimensional seismic structure of the lithosphere, J. Geophys. Res., (1896-1977), 82, 277–296, https://doi.org/10.1029/JB082i002p00277, 1977. a
Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL)/USGS: Global Seismograph Network (GSN – IRIS/USGS), https://doi.org/10.7914/SN/IU, 1988. a
AlpArray Working Group: AlpArray Seismic Network (AASN) temporary component, https://doi.org/10.12686/ALPARRAY/Z3_2015, 2015. a
Babuška, V., PlomerovÁ, J., and Granet, M.: The deep lithosphere in the Alps: a model inferred from P residuals, Tectonophysics, 176, 137–165, https://doi.org/10.1016/0040-1951(90)90263-8, 1990. a
Barruol, G., Bonnin, M., Pedersen, H., Bokelmann, G. H., and Tiberi, C.: Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps, Earth Planet. Sci. Letters, 302, 429–438, 2011. a, b
Short summary
The Alpine mountain belt was formed by the collision of the Eurasian and African plates in the geological past, during which parts of the colliding plates sank into the earth's mantle. Using seismological data from distant earthquakes recorded by the AlpArray Seismic Network, we have derived an image of the current location of these subducted parts in the earth's mantle. Their quantity and spatial distribution is key information needed to understand how the Alpine orogen was formed.