Articles | Volume 9, issue 2
Solid Earth, 9, 505–529, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-505-2018
Solid Earth, 9, 505–529, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-505-2018

Research article 26 Apr 2018

Research article | 26 Apr 2018

High stresses stored in fault zones: example of the Nojima fault (Japan)

Anne-Marie Boullier et al.

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AR by Boullier Anne-Marie on behalf of the Authors (09 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Mar 2018) by Bernhard Grasemann
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 Mar 2018)
ED: Publish as is (22 Mar 2018) by Bernhard Grasemann
ED: Publish as is (24 Mar 2018) by CharLotte Krawczyk(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
The paper describes microstructures in granitic rocks located 50 m away from the Nojima fault in Japan. Although macroscopically undeformed, the sample displays evidence for intense dynamic damage at the microscopic scale. Elastic strain and high residual stresses stored in quartz grains suggest that they were produced by propagating rupture fronts associated with M6 to M7 earthquakes and contributed to the widening of the damaged fault zone along the Nojima fault during the Paleocene.