Articles | Volume 9, issue 3
Solid Earth, 9, 573–598, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-573-2018
Solid Earth, 9, 573–598, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-9-573-2018

Research article 04 May 2018

Research article | 04 May 2018

Sedimentary mechanisms of a modern banded iron formation on Milos Island, Greece

Ernest Chi Fru et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ernest Chi Fru on behalf of the Authors (12 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (28 Mar 2018) by Elias Samankassou
AR by Ernest Chi Fru on behalf of the Authors (02 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Apr 2018) by Elias Samankassou
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (05 Apr 2018) by Elias Samankassou
AR by Ernest Chi Fru on behalf of the Authors (09 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Apr 2018) by Elias Samankassou
ED: Publish as is (16 Apr 2018) by Elias Samankassou(Executive Editor)
Download
Short summary
Banded iron formations (BIFs) are chemical sediments last seen in the marine sedimentary record ca. 600 million years ago. Here, we report on the formation mechanisms of a modern BIF analog in the Cape Vani sedimentary basin (CVSB) on Milos Island, Greece, demonstrating that rare environmental redox conditions, coupled to submarine hydrothermal activity and microbial processes, are required for these types of rocks to form in the modern marine biosphere.