Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-131
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-131
03 Sep 2019
 | 03 Sep 2019
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal SE but the revision was not accepted.

Soil-landscape relationship in sandstone-gneiss topolithosequence in Amazonas, Brazil

Julimar da Silva Fonseca, Milton César Costa Campos, Elilson Gomes de Brito Filho, Bruno Campos Mantovanelli, Laércio Santos Silva, Alan Ferreira Leite de Lima, José Maurício Da Cunha, Emily Lira Simões, and Luís Antônio Coutrim dos Santos

Abstract. Soil position in the landscape reveals its history of formation and genesis. Therefore, the landscape is the combination of features of the surface of the earth with subsurface components (parent material), while the soil is a three-dimensional, dynamic natural body inserted in the landscape. This research aimed to study the soil-landscape relationship in a sandstone-gneiss topolithosequence in Amazonas, Brazil. The study was carried out along a 9.253-meter transect from the top downwards the softer slope. Soil profiles were selected in five landscape compartments (top, upper third, lower third, transport foothill, and deposition foothill). Morphological, mineralogical, physical, chemical, and ray diffraction characterizations were performed. Soils had different morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical attributes due to the variations of the geological substrate and landscape position. The mineralogy of the clay fraction is composed of kaolinite, goethite, hematite, and gibbsite, with goethite being the predominant iron oxide. A sand fraction dominance was observed in relation to the other fractions in all the profiles, being related to the alluvial nature of the parent material, with the highest values occurring in the lower third. The separation of the landscape into geomorphic surfaces and identification of the parent material were effective for understanding the variation of soil attributes along the landscape.

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Julimar da Silva Fonseca, Milton César Costa Campos, Elilson Gomes de Brito Filho, Bruno Campos Mantovanelli, Laércio Santos Silva, Alan Ferreira Leite de Lima, José Maurício Da Cunha, Emily Lira Simões, and Luís Antônio Coutrim dos Santos
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Julimar da Silva Fonseca, Milton César Costa Campos, Elilson Gomes de Brito Filho, Bruno Campos Mantovanelli, Laércio Santos Silva, Alan Ferreira Leite de Lima, José Maurício Da Cunha, Emily Lira Simões, and Luís Antônio Coutrim dos Santos
Julimar da Silva Fonseca, Milton César Costa Campos, Elilson Gomes de Brito Filho, Bruno Campos Mantovanelli, Laércio Santos Silva, Alan Ferreira Leite de Lima, José Maurício Da Cunha, Emily Lira Simões, and Luís Antônio Coutrim dos Santos

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Short summary
The Amazon biome has a rich biodiversity, as well as the soils that suffer from the current intensive deforestation, so this work brings important information of the soils of this biome evaluating the most diverse aspects and relating with the dynamics of this complex ecosystem. Bringing important results such as clay mineralogy revealed that the poor chemistry due to the low CTC of these soils is related to the source material and not to environmental removal, as is common in Amazonian soils.