Articles | Volume 10, issue 5
Solid Earth, 10, 1757–1784, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-10-1757-2019
Solid Earth, 10, 1757–1784, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-10-1757-2019

Research article 24 Oct 2019

Research article | 24 Oct 2019

Structure of massively dilatant faults in Iceland: lessons learned from high-resolution unmanned aerial vehicle data

Christopher Weismüller et al.

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AR by Christopher Weismüller on behalf of the Authors (11 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Sep 2019) by Cristiano Collettini
ED: Publish as is (16 Sep 2019) by Federico Rossetti(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
We use drones to study surface geometries of massively dilatant faults (MDFs) in Iceland, with apertures up to tens of meters at the surface. Based on throw, aperture and structures, we define three geometrically different endmembers of the surface expression of MDFs and show that they belong to one continuum. The transition between the endmembers is fluent and can change at one fault over short distances, implying less distinct control of deeper structures on surface geometries than expected.