Articles | Volume 12, issue 10
Solid Earth, 12, 2439–2466, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2439-2021
Solid Earth, 12, 2439–2466, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-2439-2021

Research article 28 Oct 2021

Research article | 28 Oct 2021

What makes seep carbonates ignore self-sealing and grow vertically: the role of burrowing decapod crustaceans

Jean-Philippe Blouet et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jean-Philippe Blouet on behalf of the Authors (25 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 May 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (01 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Jun 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Jun 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
AR by Jean-Philippe Blouet on behalf of the Authors (12 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Jul 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
ED: Publish as is (18 Jul 2021) by Arjen Stroeven(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Biochemical reactions related to hydrocarbon seepage are known to induce carbonates in marine sediments. Seep carbonates may act as seals and force lateral deviations of rising hydrocarbons. However, crustacean burrows may act as efficient vertical fluid channels allowing hydrocarbons to pass through upward, thereby allowing the vertical growth of carbonate stacks over time. This mechanism may explain the origin of carbonate columns in marine sediments throughout hydrocarbon provinces worldwide.