Articles | Volume 13, issue 2
Solid Earth, 13, 301–322, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-13-301-2022
Solid Earth, 13, 301–322, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-13-301-2022

Research article 02 Feb 2022

Research article | 02 Feb 2022

Multi-disciplinary characterizations of the BedrettoLab – a new underground geoscience research facility

Xiaodong Ma et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on se-2021-109', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Oct 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Xiaodong Ma, 15 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on se-2021-109', Pär Grahm, 12 Nov 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Xiaodong Ma, 07 Dec 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on se-2021-109', Pär Grahm, 12 Nov 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', Xiaodong Ma, 13 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Xiaodong Ma on behalf of the Authors (16 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Dec 2021) by David Healy
ED: Publish as is (17 Dec 2021) by Federico Rossetti(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Questions on issues such as anthropogenic earthquakes and deep geothermal energy developments require a better understanding of the fractured rock. Experiments conducted at reduced scales but with higher-resolution observations can shed some light. To this end, the BedrettoLab was recently established in an existing tunnel in Ticino, Switzerland, with preliminary efforts to characterize realistic rock mass behavior at the hectometer scale.