Articles | Volume 13, issue 3
Solid Earth, 13, 725–743, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-13-725-2022
Solid Earth, 13, 725–743, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-13-725-2022
Research article
24 Mar 2022
Research article | 24 Mar 2022

Matrix gas flow through “impermeable” rocks – shales and tight sandstone

Ernest Rutter et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on se-2021-140', Christian David, 20 Dec 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on CC1', Ernest H. Rutter, 06 Jan 2022
      • CC2: 'Reply on AC1', Christian David, 06 Jan 2022
        • AC3: 'Reply on CC2', Ernest H. Rutter, 06 Jan 2022
  • RC1: 'Comment on se-2021-140', Anonymous Referee #1, 03 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC1', Ernest H. Rutter, 06 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ernest H. Rutter on behalf of the Authors (29 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (08 Feb 2022) by Florian Fusseis
ED: Publish as is (14 Feb 2022) by Joachim Gottsmann(Executive Editor)
AR by Ernest H. Rutter on behalf of the Authors (18 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Underground energy and waste storage require repurposing of existing oil and gas wells for gas storage, compressed air, hydrogen, methane, and CO2 disposal, requiring an impermeable cap rock (e.g. shales) over the porous reservoir. We measured shale permeability over a range of burial pressures and gas pore pressures. Permeability decreases markedly as effective pressure on the rocks is increased. Knowing these relationships is essential to the safe design of engineered gas reservoirs.