Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
Solid Earth, 12, 375–387, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-375-2021

Special issue: Thermo-hydro-mechanical–chemical (THMC) processes in natural...

Solid Earth, 12, 375–387, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-375-2021

Research article 16 Feb 2021

Research article | 16 Feb 2021

The competition between fracture nucleation, propagation, and coalescence in dry and water-saturated crystalline rock

Jessica A. McBeck et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jessica McBeck on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Sep 2020) by Andre R. Niemeijer
RR by Franciscus Aben (14 Oct 2020)
RR by Zeev Reches (14 Dec 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (20 Dec 2020) by Andre R. Niemeijer
AR by Jessica McBeck on behalf of the Authors (22 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Dec 2020) by Andre R. Niemeijer
RR by Franciscus Aben (08 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (08 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jan 2021) by Andre R. Niemeijer
AR by Jessica McBeck on behalf of the Authors (13 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Jan 2021) by Andre R. Niemeijer
ED: Publish as is (14 Jan 2021) by Susanne Buiter(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
The competing modes of fault network development, including nucleation, propagation, and coalescence, influence the localization and connectivity of fracture networks and are thus critical influences on permeability. We distinguish between these modes of fracture development using in situ X-ray tomography triaxial compression experiments on crystalline rocks. The results underscore the importance of confining stress (burial depth) and fluids on fault network development.