Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
Solid Earth, 12, 1185–1196, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-1185-2021

Special issue: New insights into the tectonic evolution of the Alps and the...

Solid Earth, 12, 1185–1196, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-12-1185-2021

Research article 27 May 2021

Research article | 27 May 2021

Moho topography beneath the European Eastern Alps by global-phase seismic interferometry

Irene Bianchi et al.

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Irene Bianchi on behalf of the Authors (15 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Feb 2021) by Anne Paul
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Mar 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Mar 2021) by Anne Paul
AR by Irene Bianchi on behalf of the Authors (01 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (12 Apr 2021) by Anne Paul
ED: Publish as is (12 Apr 2021) by CharLotte Krawczyk(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
The European Alps formed during collision between the European and Adriatic plates and are one of the most studied orogens for understanding the dynamics of mountain building. In the Eastern Alps, the contact between the colliding plates is still a matter of debate. We have used the records from distant earthquakes to highlight the geometries of the crust–mantle boundary in the Eastern Alpine area; our results suggest a complex and faulted internal crustal structure beneath the higher crests.