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Solid Earth An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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SE | Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
Solid Earth, 11, 259–286, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-259-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Solid Earth, 11, 259–286, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-259-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 Mar 2020

Research article | 02 Mar 2020

The variation and visualisation of elastic anisotropy in rock-forming minerals

David Healy et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by David Healy on behalf of the Authors (20 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Jan 2020) by Cristiano Collettini
ED: Publish as is (28 Jan 2020) by Federico Rossetti(Executive Editor)
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Rock-forming minerals behave elastically, a property that controls their ability to support stress and strain, controls the transmission of seismic waves, and influences subsequent permanent deformation. Minerals are intrinsically anisotropic in their elastic properties; that is, they have directional variations that are related to the crystal lattice. We explore this directionality and present new ways of visualising it. We hope this will enable further advances in understanding deformation.
Rock-forming minerals behave elastically, a property that controls their ability to support...
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