Articles | Volume 10, issue 3
Solid Earth, 10, 637–645, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-10-637-2019

Special issue: Advances in seismic imaging across the scales

Solid Earth, 10, 637–645, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-10-637-2019

Research article 14 May 2019

Research article | 14 May 2019

Migration of reflector orientation attributes in deep seismic profiles: evidence for decoupling of the Yilgarn Craton lower crust

Andrew J. Calvert and Michael P. Doublier

Related subject area

Subject area: Crustal structure and composition | Editorial team: Seismics, seismology, geoelectrics, and electromagnetics | Discipline: Seismology
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Cited articles

Beckel, R. A. and Juhlin, C.: The crossdip correction as a tool to improve imaging of crooked line seismic data: A case study from the post-glacial Burträsk fault, Sweden, Solid Earth Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2018-120, in review, 2018. 
Bellefleur, G., Calvert, A. J., and Chouteau, M. C.: A link between deformation history and the orientation of reflective structures in the 2.68–2.83 Ga Opatica belt of the Superior Province, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 15243–15257, https://doi.org/10.1029/97jB00505, 1997. 
Calvert, A. J.: A method for avoiding artefacts in the migration of deep seismic reflection data, Tectonophysics, 388, 201–212, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tecto.2004.07.026, 2004. 
Calvert, A. J.: Continuous estimation of 3-D reflector orientations along 2-D deep seismic reflection profiles, Tectonophysics, 718, 61–71, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tecto.2016.11.002, 2017.  
Calvert, A. J. and Doublier, M. P.: Archaean continental spreading inferred from seismic images of the Yilgarn Craton, Nat. Geosci., 11, 526–530, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-018-0138-0, 2018. 
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Short summary
Deep (> 40 km) seismic reflection surveys are acquired on land along crooked roads. Using the varying azimuth between source and receiver, the true 3-D orientation of crustal structures can be determined. Applying this method to a survey over the ancient Australian Yilgarn Craton reveals that most reflectors in the lower crust exhibit a systematic dip perpendicular to those in the overlying crust, consistent with lateral flow of a weak lower crust in the hotter early Earth 2.7 billion years ago.