Articles | Volume 11, issue 4
Solid Earth, 11, 1571–1595, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-1571-2020

Special issue: Faults, fractures, and fluid flow in the shallow crust

Solid Earth, 11, 1571–1595, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-11-1571-2020

Research article 26 Aug 2020

Research article | 26 Aug 2020

On the morphology and amplitude of 2D and 3D thermal anomalies induced by buoyancy-driven flow within and around fault zones

Laurent Guillou-Frottier et al.

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Cited articles

Achtziger-Putančič, P., Loew, S., Hiller, A., and Mariethoz, G.: 3D fluid flow in fault zones of crystalline basement rocks (Poehla-Tellerhaeuser Ore Field, Ore Mountains, Germany), Geofluids, 16, 688–710, https://doi.org/10.1111/gfl.12192, 2016. 
Achtziger-Putančič, P., Loew, S., and Hiller, A.: Factors controlling the permeability distribution in fault vein zones surrounding granitic intrusions (Ore Mountains/Germany), J. Geophys. Res., 122, 1876–1899, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JB013619, 2017. 
Ague, J. J.: Fluid flow in the deep crust, Treatise on geochemistry, 2nd Edn., Elsevier, 203–247, https://doi.org/10.1016/B9780-08-095975-7.00306-5, 2014. 
Andersen, C., Rüpke, L., Hasenclever, J., Grevemeyer, I., and Petersen, S.: Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43, 51–54, https://doi.org/10.1130/G36113.1, 2015. 
Artemieva, I. M., Thybo, H., Jakobsen, K., Sorensen, N. K., and Nielsen, L. S. K.: Heat production in granitic rocks: Global analysis based on a new data compilation GRANITE2017, Earth Sci. Rev., 172, 1–26, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.07.003, 2017. 
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Short summary
In the first kilometers of the subsurface, temperature anomalies due to heat conduction rarely exceed 20–30°C. However, when deep hot fluids in the shallow crust flow upwards, for example through permeable fault zones, hydrothermal convection can form high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Numerical modeling of hydrothermal convection shows that vertical fault zones may host funnel-shaped, kilometer-sized geothermal reservoirs whose exploitation would not need drilling at depths below 2–3 km.